23: Demands from the Outlaws


“Ten shillings for my dog maimed…..”
“Five for the loss of my sow…..”
“Four marks for my stolen horse….”
“My son thrown down a well…”
The priest began to tally the individual cases.
“Roughly,” the friar eventually said, “one hundred….”
He raised his hand to scratch his head and he touched the massive bump caused by the Sheriff’s sword.
“TWO hundred shillings.”

“You thieving mock-priest!” Yelled De Lacy, “Why don’t you join them too?”
The friar looked surprised.
“God forgive me,” he said, “It seems I have already done so.”
The outlaws roared with laughter.

“Come,” said Little John to the Sheriff, “Let’s see the colour of your money.”
Stutely quickly severed De Lacey’s purse from his belt and poured out a stream of golden coins onto the table.

“You’ll pay for this,” raged the Sheriff, “my men will take you yet and hang you too– as an example to other rebels.”
“But first,” said Robin, “we’ll make an example of you.”

At Robin’s signal the Sheriff was surrounded. Then Stutely ran in with a pair of antlers, which the men bound firmly around De Lacey’s head. With yells of laughter he was tied to his horse with his face turned towards the creature’s tail. As a final touch, Stutely put the horse’s tail in the Sheriff’s bound hands.

With a smack on the rump the horse leaped forward carrying a furious Sheriff back to Nottingham amidst yells of laughter.


(To read the earlier chapters of the story from the film, please click on the Label 'Story.')

2 comments:

Clement of the Glen said...

Walt Disney's Story of Robin Hood
Demands from the Outlaws
Story from the Film

Neil said...

The action for this scene takes place at Robin Hood's camp which was a studio set about 280 ft or more wide on one of the enormous Denham sound stages. The other one was filled with the castle set. If you look carefully to when Little John returns with the horse we get a glimpse of the forest and greenery which forms the side to this huge set. Also the horse carrying Peter Finch gallops up the hill on the set into the trees giving an indication of the scale. I often wish I could have been transported back to wander round these sets at Denham. Think I would have been both thrilled and astounded.